How to Make Raw Garlic Powder


I got this idea from my beautiful cousin, a fellow DIYer from Cali. When I found out she made her own garlic powder, I knew I had to find out how!  A few months ago, she had a 3-hour layover in Seattle, and we hadn’t seen each other in years.  It was a no-brainer – we simply had to get together!  So my daughter and I drove down to the airport meet her, and we took her out to dinner.  We had a great time together over some very delicious lamb, and she revealed how easy it is to make your own garlic powder.

As soon as my store-bought garlic powder ran out, I tried my hand at it with a modification or two to fit my style.  I always change things up to fit my style, don’t you?  ;)

She has given me permission to share it with you all!  Thank you, dear Cousin!

Raw Garlic Powder

Gather supplies:

• One head of garlic
• Garlic press
Knife
• Dehydrator tray lined with wax paper or equivalent

Break apart your head of garlic into individual cloves. Cut off the ends and peel, if needed. (I don’t always peel my garlic when using a press.)

Press through garlic press directly onto the lined dehydrator tray. If you don’t have a garlic press, slice the garlic very thinly.

Spread pressed or sliced garlic thinly on tray and dehydrate on low for 12 – 24 hours. I set my Excalibur to 95 degrees.  Enjoy the garlic smell wafting through your house!

You can also use an oven set on the lowest setting. This does not guarantee that the finished product will still be raw as the lowest setting on most modern ovens is 170 degrees. If desired, you can leave the oven door open to lower the temperature.  Keep in mind, the garlic might be dried sooner than 12 hours.

Put dried garlic “chips” in blender or coffee grinder and grind to powder.  Store in appropriate container.

I promise you, this will be the best garlic powder you have ever tasted!  It is very strong and will last much longer than your store-bought garlic powder because you won’t use as much. Warning! You may need to adjust your recipes to taste unless you really like garlic.

I hope you enjoy this as much as we do!

Featured on Homestead Barn HopMake Your Own! Monday and Little House in the Suburbs.

Shared on Monday ManiaMake Your Own! Monday, Morristribe’s Homestead CarnivalHomestead Barn HopFat Tuesday, Traditional Tuesdays, Domestically Divine Tuesday, Tiny Tip Tuesday, Titus 2sday, Scratch Cookin’ Tuesday, Frugal Tuesday Tip, Hearth and SoulThankful HomemakerReal Food Wednesday, Frugal Days Sustainable Ways, Homemaking Link-Up, Healthy 2Day Wednesday, Whole Foods Wednesday, Simple Lives Thursday, Keep It Real Thursday, Pennywise Platter Thursday, Fill Those Jars Friday, Farm Girl Blog FestFight Back Friday and LHITS DIY Linky.

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  • Gopika

    Brilliant!!!

    • TheUrbanHearth

      Thank you. I’ll tell my cousin. ;)

      • TheUrbanHearth

        She also puts the garlic on a silpat and puts it in the car during the hot summer months to dehydrate. Genius!

  • Linda Vincent

    Great information!

    • TheUrbanHearth

      Thank you, Linda!

  • Paula @ All Things Moms

    LOVE this!! I bought garlic in bulk this month because it was so cheap- 3 pounds! Now I know it won’t go bad…. and I have the fantastic Pampered Chef garlic press too!

    • TheUrbanHearth

      Yay! I’m so glad to hear this, and I love the PC garlic press, too! :)

  • Lisa Steele

    This looks amazing! New fan here. I hope I can persuade you to come share on my Farm Girl Blog Fest: http://fresh-eggs-daily.blogspot.com/2012/09/farm-girl-friday-blog-fest-2.html

    • TheUrbanHearth

      Thanks, Lisa! I’ll definitely come on over on Friday!

    • TheUrbanHearth

      New fan here, too, Lisa! ;)

  • Julia McGuire

    thank you for joining the Frugal Tuesday Tip! http://juliecache.com/2012/10/01/frugal-tuesday-tip-october-is-here/.html I’ll bet the smell is amazing. Not sure that I’m brave enough to try this.

    • TheUrbanHearth

      You’re welcome, Julia. Thanks for stopping by! It’s really easy. You should try just a few cloves to start with. You’ll be sold in a heartbeat. :)

  • Denise @WholemadeGoodness

    Who knew this could be so easy? We will be giving this one a try soon. Thanks.

    • TheUrbanHearth

      That’s exactly what I said when my cousin told me how it was done. Thank you for stopping by, Denise!

  • Jill @ The Prairie Homestead

    Great post! In fact, I liked it so much that I chose it for my featured pick in tomorrow’s Homestead Barn Hop. Keep up the great work!

    • TheUrbanHearth

      Oh my goodness, Jill. What a blessing to be featured by my favorite homestead blogger! :) I’m so very honored and will definitely keep it up. Thanks for stopping by to let me know.

  • Lisa @ HappyinDoleValley

    Love this! Thanks so much for sharing — can’t wait to try this for myself. :)

    • TheUrbanHearth

      You’re welcome, Lisa! It was my pleasure, and I’m glad you liked it.

  • Dyan Taylor

    Thank you for this recipie! I will be retired, living in TN come spring and look forward so much to growing a garden again. You are making me even more anxious!! LOL Thanks for all your wonderful posts.

    • Leola

      You’re welcome, Dyan! I hope have a lovely time in your garden!

    • TheUrbanHearth

      You’re welcome, Dyan! I hope you thoroughly enjoy your garden. Such good therapy there! :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/deana.rogers.71 Deana Rogers

    I just found your tip threw Homestead Barn Hop. I am going to be giving this a try and I will be making small jars of it to give out for christmas gifts in the food baskets I plan to make this year with homemade jams, breads and butters. We are going to be opening a small cafe with some friends of ours I think I will be using this in the kitchen there as well. I will have to use my oven for now till I can locate me a food hydrator on sale or for free.
    deana
    dfwquiltr37

    • TheUrbanHearth

      What wonderful plans, Deana! Thank you for letting me know!

  • emily a

    This is awesome! I grew garlic for the first time last year. Despite having to move the garden (twice) before spring I actually got a pretty good harvest. I’m going to be planting sometime this week, and I’ll use half of what’s left to make garlic powder! My mother in law does a lot of cooking and she doesn’t like using the fresh garlic I bring her, but she’ll use this up fast… Even if I do end up cooking it a bit during the drying process, it’ll be way better than the crap she buys at the “discount” grocery! And I haven’t used garlic powder in years! I’ll get to be lazy about my garlic again… he he he
    Did you notice much juice when you pressed your garlic? I was thinking about putting my garlic mush in a mesh strainer overnight in the fridge to let any juice drain. Then continuing with the drying process. Depending on how much juice I got I would use it up immediately or freeze some of it. Just a thought…

    • TheUrbanHearth

      I did not notice a lot of garlic juice, Emily. I wonder if it depends on the garlic press. Mine is from Pampered Chef. I also think it may not be as strong if you strained the juice, but whatever you do is your preference. :-) Thanks for stopping by!

      • emily a

        Maybe I’ll try half and half and see if there is a difference. I was thinking since you dehydrate the garlic anyway, you would be evaporating the juice. But it would leave the flavor behind. Hmm… I’ll let you know if we can taste the difference between the two batches. Thank you again for posting the directions. Hopefully I’ll be trying this out tomorrow!

  • http://www.sweetkissesanddirtydishes.com/ Debra

    This is so cool! I wonder how it compares cost wise, but if it is stronger it just might be cheaper.

    • TheUrbanHearth

      I think so, Debra, but don’t know for certain. I might try to find out though and add it to the post. Good suggestion!

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  • Linda

    How cool!

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  • Sue

    It is extremely easy to grow your own garlic and this is the perfect way to get the most use out of your gardening efforts. Now is the time to plant garlic for a harvest next summer.